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The Urban Regeneration Project “F1963”

 

The Lecture “Urban Renewal from Participation to Activism” by Armelle Tardiveau introduced how to create and design a public area where citizens can be invited to enjoy with the protection of the history, culture, and environment of the site or city using the example of urban regeneration project Île de Nantes (fig.1).

 

The key points of the Île de Nantes project could be

  1. To protect the memory of the site and the abandoned industrial heritage rather than demolition
  2. To encourage the diverse activities people can participate and enjoy
  3. To connect the man-made island and other side of the city
  4. To apply ecological and artistic concept
  5. To develop the city and local economy

 

Fig.1 The urban regeneration project Île de Nantes (Left, Available at: https://actu.fr/pays-de-la-loire/nantes_44109/pourquoi-l-ile-de-nantes-s-appelle-l-ile-de-nantes_45353217.html) (Right, Available at: https://www.chausseliere.com/actualites/les-machines-de-lile-a-nantes/)

 

 

As the increase of the awareness about the environmental issue such as global warming and climate change, the position of renovating an old building or heritage is becoming bigger in architectural society.

I am interested in the industrial heritage renovation project. Therefore, I researched other case of the urban renovation project, I will introduce the case of my country, South Korea.

 

From ‘Kiswire Factory’ to Multicultural Complex ‘F1963’ in Busan, South Korea

Fig.2  Kiswire Factory (Left: in 1963, Right: in 2015) (Left, Available at: http://www.f1963.org/ko/?c=about&s=1) (Right, Available at: http://www.bchoarchitects.com/ws/projects/%EB%B0%95%ED%83%9C%EC%A4%80-%EA%B8%B0%EB%85%90%EA%B4%80-2-2?ckattempt=1)

 

Kiswire’s first factory manufacturing wires was established in 1963 and closed in 2008 (F1963, n.d.) (fig.2). The factory was no longer used as a factory, it was empty. In 2014, The Kiswire reopened the part of the building as a Kiswire centre which shows the history of the company. The city of Busan was looking for a place for the Busan Biennale, and then the part of the factory was used as an exhibition hall for the Busan Biennale Special Exhibition in 2014. The training centre of Kiswire’s headquarter was built next to the factory, Kiswire started to figure out a way of reusing the whole building of the old factory in 2016. Then, in the wake of the Busan Biennale in 2014, Busan City once again requested to use it as a main exhibition hall for the 2016 Busan Biennale (fig.4), and Kiswire signed a contract to renovate the factory as a complex cultural space for citizens in the cooperation with Busan City and to offer it as the place for the Biennale for 20 years in free (Yonhap News, 2016). With the cooperation of Busan City and Kiswire, the factory was reborn as the current F1963. After the biennale, F1963 was loved by many citizens and became a hot place in Busan (Eom, Yoon and An, 2021). F1963 wins Grand Prize (Prime Minister Awards) at the Good Place Awards In 2018 (F1963, n.d.).

 

Fig.3 Diagram about the spaces (Available at: http://www.f1963.org/en/?c=facil&s=2)

 

Fig.4 2016 Busan Biennale (Available at: http://www.bchoarchitects.com/ws/projects/%EB%B0%95%ED%83%9C%EC%A4%80-%EA%B8%B0%EB%85%90%EA%B4%80-2-2?ckattempt=1)

F1963 currently consists of an exhibition hall, cafe, restaurant, library, bookstore, and open public square, and the exhibition hall (fig.3 and 5) is usually used as a space for exhibiting or holding concerts by local artists, and it is used as the main exhibition hall for the Busan Biennale in the Biennale period (F1963, n.d.). Concerts for citizens are often held in the open public square and used as various events (F1963, n.d.).

 

 

 

 

 

Fig.5 The spaces in F1963 (Available at: http://www.f1963.org/ko/?c=about&s=3)

 

If you look at some details, the main form and structure have been kept almost fully with repairs, the façade is maintained using blue expanded metals (fig.6). The architect used wires for the interior space, which had huge changes for a new function, to highlight the memory of the manufacturing history (Eom, Yoon and An, 2021).

Fig.6 Exterior of F1963

 

The space, where a massive crane used to be, has been transformed into a bookshop by adding steel posts to support newly added ceilings and other elements (Oh and Yoo, 2019) (fig.7).

Fig.7 The transformation from the factory to the book shop

 

The part of the middle of the factory ceiling was demolished to make open space (fig.8), it became an open public square for diverse cultural events (Oh and Yoo, 2019).

Fig.8 Before the renovation (Available at: http://www.f1963.org/upload/about/F1963_leaflet_KR_HIGH_spread.pdf)

 

In 2020, 600 thousand people visited despite the travel restriction in the Pandemic situation by Corona Virus, there were 480 thousand visitors until September 2021 (Ko, 2021). The Île de Nantes project and F1963 show how well-regenerated projects can be attractive places to people with achieving  a sustainability as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Eom, J., Yoon, S. and An, D. (2021) The sustainability of regenerative café utilizing idle industrial facilities in south korea, Sustainability 2021, 13(9).

F1963 (n.d.) Available at: http://www.f1963.org/en/?c=about&s=1 (Accessed: 17 October 2022).

Younhap News (2016) 부산비엔날레 열린 고려제강 폐공장 20년 무상 제공, Available at: https://www.yna.co.kr/view/AKR20161228051100051?input=1195m (Accessed: 17 October 2022).

Ko, S.H. (2021) F1963, 폐공장이 ‘핫플’로…“옛것과 새것의 조화·창의적 재해석”. Heraldcorp, [online]

Available at: http://news.heraldcorp.com/view.php?ud=20211007000641 (Accessed: 17 October 2022).

Oh, S.H. and Yoo, D.M. (2019) 세계의 재생 건축 프로젝트. Design House, [online] Available at: http://mdesign.designhouse.co.kr/article/article_view/106/79653 (Accessed: 17 October 2022).

 

 

 

One response to “The Urban Regeneration Project “F1963””

  1. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    I would first like to commend you for providing clear key points to quickly inform the reader of the lecture’s premise. I also found the ‘F1963’ precedent to be a fitting example of an industrial renovation project, greatly relevant to the first portion of the lecture. A couple of quick observations: I think it would have been beneficial to quickly outline and summarize the portion of the lecture pertaining to Misery Quarry and found ways to relate your precedent (F1963) back to how it could be implemented in the desolate, abandoned quarry; or further explained its connection to Île de Nantes. For example, I find the factory’s programming (exhibition, restaurant, library, etc.) to be a very intriguing feature that may be a starting point to involving local citizens in the designing of Misery Quarry.

    While reading this post, I had a couple references/precedents come to mind. Naturally, one of these precedents resides in my hometown of Toronto, Canada: 401 Richmond. Originally a canning factory, 401 Richmond has since been redeveloped into the iconic arts hub it is known as today. Guided by the vision of Margie Ziedler, the warehouse was reimagined in 1994 as a “Village in a Box” (Way, 2013). During the time when the industrial building was purchased, “the surrounding neighborhood from which the Queen Street West art scene had emerged was characterized as ‘totally dead’ and the building as ‘largely vacant’”(Bain & Marsh, 2019, p. 184). Ziedler turned to the principles of Jane Jacobs to embrace what appear as desolate spaces and structures to provide the local and greater community with raw studio spaces. Today, 401 Richmond holds 140 tenants with 79% of them being art-based – social and creative innovation fields (Bain & Marsh, 2019, p. 186). Reverting to the post, 401 Richmond takes on a similar approach as F1963, injecting ‘cultural’ spaces into a nostalgic yet purposeless industrial building. I feel that providing a space for the creative community to congregate can be a method to involve locals and create the sense of a ’place.’

    The second reference that came to mind is an article I read recently titled: “Landscapes of industrial excess: A thick sections approach to Gas Works Park,” written by Thäisa Way. In summation, Way brings to light the revolutionary regeneration of Gas Works Park in Seattle, Washington done by Richard Haag Associates. Haag’s design decisions are what led to the park being, “the first post-industrial landscape to be transformed into public space without requiring the removal of its pollutants and waste to a landfill” (Way, 2013, p. 8). Furthermore, instead of removing the rusted industrial apparatuses on the site, Haag left them as what became iconic public art (Way, 2013). In turn, the article got me thinking about different means of reusing industrial buildings and the corresponding sites. Can these industrial pieces become informative reminders of the past?

    In conclusion, what I have drawn from the post and these various references/precedents is the urgent need to find more innovative reuses of obsolete structures, especially solutions that don’t follow the process of demolition and rebuilding. An answer to this appears to be found in local participation in the design process.
    _____________

    References

    Bain, A. L., & March, L. (2019). Urban Redevelopment, Cultural Philanthropy and the Commodification
    of Artistic Authenticity in Toronto. City & Community, 18(1), 173–194.
    https://doi.org/10.1111/cico.12359

    Way, T. (2013). Landscapes of industrial excess: A thick sections approach to Gas Works Park. Journal of
    Landscape Architecture, 8(1), 28–39. https://doi.org/10.1080/18626033.2013.798920

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  1. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    I would first like to commend you for providing clear key points to quickly inform the reader of the lecture’s premise. I also found the ‘F1963’ precedent to be a fitting example of an industrial renovation project, greatly relevant to the first portion of the lecture. A couple of quick observations: I think it would have been beneficial to quickly outline and summarize the portion of the lecture pertaining to Misery Quarry and found ways to relate your precedent (F1963) back to how it could be implemented in the desolate, abandoned quarry; or further explained its connection to Île de Nantes. For example, I find the factory’s programming (exhibition, restaurant, library, etc.) to be a very intriguing feature that may be a starting point to involving local citizens in the designing of Misery Quarry.

    While reading this post, I had a couple references/precedents come to mind. Naturally, one of these precedents resides in my hometown of Toronto, Canada: 401 Richmond. Originally a canning factory, 401 Richmond has since been redeveloped into the iconic arts hub it is known as today. Guided by the vision of Margie Ziedler, the warehouse was reimagined in 1994 as a “Village in a Box” (Way, 2013). During the time when the industrial building was purchased, “the surrounding neighborhood from which the Queen Street West art scene had emerged was characterized as ‘totally dead’ and the building as ‘largely vacant’”(Bain & Marsh, 2019, p. 184). Ziedler turned to the principles of Jane Jacobs to embrace what appear as desolate spaces and structures to provide the local and greater community with raw studio spaces. Today, 401 Richmond holds 140 tenants with 79% of them being art-based – social and creative innovation fields (Bain & Marsh, 2019, p. 186). Reverting to the post, 401 Richmond takes on a similar approach as F1963, injecting ‘cultural’ spaces into a nostalgic yet purposeless industrial building. I feel that providing a space for the creative community to congregate can be a method to involve locals and create the sense of a ’place.’

    The second reference that came to mind is an article I read recently titled: “Landscapes of industrial excess: A thick sections approach to Gas Works Park,” written by Thäisa Way. In summation, Way brings to light the revolutionary regeneration of Gas Works Park in Seattle, Washington done by Richard Haag Associates. Haag’s design decisions are what led to the park being, “the first post-industrial landscape to be transformed into public space without requiring the removal of its pollutants and waste to a landfill” (Way, 2013, p. 8). Furthermore, instead of removing the rusted industrial apparatuses on the site, Haag left them as what became iconic public art (Way, 2013). In turn, the article got me thinking about different means of reusing industrial buildings and the corresponding sites. Can these industrial pieces become informative reminders of the past?

    In conclusion, what I have drawn from the post and these various references/precedents is the urgent need to find more innovative reuses of obsolete structures, especially solutions that don’t follow the process of demolition and rebuilding. An answer to this appears to be found in local participation in the design process.
    _____________

    References

    Bain, A. L., & March, L. (2019). Urban Redevelopment, Cultural Philanthropy and the Commodification
    of Artistic Authenticity in Toronto. City & Community, 18(1), 173–194.
    https://doi.org/10.1111/cico.12359

    Way, T. (2013). Landscapes of industrial excess: A thick sections approach to Gas Works Park. Journal of
    Landscape Architecture, 8(1), 28–39. https://doi.org/10.1080/18626033.2013.798920

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School of Architecture
Planning and Landscape
Newcastle upon Tyne
Tyne and Wear, NE1 7RU

Telephone: 0191 208 6509

Email: nicola.rutherford@ncl.ac.uk